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Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
there was a san francisco interface council there was the san francisco conference on religion, race and social concerns which for 25 years was the voice of social justice in the city and county of san francisco. it was that movement that gave birth to the san francisco interfaith council whose mission it is to bring people together of different faiths, to celebrate our diverse spiritual and religious traditions, build understanding, and serve our city. it was a previous mayor that challenged the interface council to step up to the place, to respond to its moral responsibility to care for the homeless at a time of crisis spun out of control, and we did. for almost a quarter of a century we have opened our congregation doors, fed and provided a warm and safe place for homeless men to sleep during the coldest and rainiest nights of the year. it's been this mayor and his predecessors who look to what happened at hurricane katrina, saw the key role that congregation leaders, facilities and congre gants can play at the time of a diseafert disaster and called us to stakeholders and mayor lee invi
and said it is as much about economic inequality as religion. she traces much today's problems back to ferdinand marcos. >> the government insiitute a lot of government policies that suppressed the muslim population. and after that, the military really violated human. >> reporter: that sowed the seeds for radicalization by some rebel fighters. by the 1990s a regional al qaeda affiliate began to thrive. >> to even help you understand why you're oppressed. >> reporter: are they growing? >> as far as we're concernedr: it's not growing. >> reporter: army major carlospe sole says they have largely been contained as a military threat in part helped by u.s. advisers who remain in the region. philippine officials also note that the peace treaty gives them more autonomy and control over resources. factions on either side remain unhappy with the peace process and there are frequent localized clashes, and trust continues to be in short ply. that's a void both the militaryy and the main rebel group the milf, say foreign civilians can fill effectively. >> only an armed civiliani protects the mon
children were not killed in sandy hook based upon their ethnicity or their religion or their politics. it was human beings shot by madness. and the combination of a mental depression and that of posttraumatic syndrome, even put politics in chicago, for example, 49% people this year. 75% under the age of 18. so we look at 27, which was such a gross situation there in sandy hook, but in chicago, that's why at some point the president would come and speak in chicago and right here in inglewood because he is not just about mental illness. it's also about politics of war, drug war, guns, and drugs in and jobs out. we have a very different warfare scene than in a place like this. >> what would you do to protect school children right now? >> i think, first, the ban on assault weapons is a step in the right direction. secondly, stop gun trafficking across state lines, second thing. the third thing is you must -- we have more police patrols around schools in chicago, in inglewood, for example. shootings are down because more police patrol. but these are official police patrolling as opposed to
of culture, race or religion or tribe there is some commonality. these are essential human truths and passions and truth and moral precepts. >> guest: in some ways that is a variation of what he said in a speech that made him famous in 2004 keynote address at the democratic national convention in boston where he said there are no red states or. states that the united states. that prevented himself as the personification of that notion. his presidency has been a rude awakening in terms of how far he could take that. he has been dealing with the promise and frustrations of that idea ever since as i am sure we will both be experiencing when the telephone calls come for the show. >> host: your book ends in 1989, "barack obama: the story". you say there's another volume coming. >> guest: 40 years of robert caro who is one of my heroes, check that out on the down load. i have every intention -- i have a lot of reporting which influenced this first book even though they are not in it. i don't want to do quickie, i don't want my books -- i write them for history. there are a lot of docume
made sense is regardless of culture and race and religion, there is some commonality. the essential human truths and passions and hopes and moral precepts that are universal. >> guest: that is part of the speech that made him famous. the united states, not just red states and blue states. he presented himself as the personification of that notion. the presidency has been a rude awakening in terms of how far you can take that. so he could deal with the promise and frustrations of that idea ever since. as i'm sure we would both be experiencing in the telephone calls. >> host: so your book ends in 1989. he said there is another common? >> guest: i didn't want to get too ahead of myself, but i have every intention. i've done a lot of reporting through the years. i don't want to do a quickie. i don't write my books for the politics of the moment. >> host: the book ends in 1989. but at this point, barack obama, so far lived in seattle and 1962 until 1967, back to honolulu and then back to indonesia. 1967 to 1971, back to honolulu, 79 to 1981, los angeles and then he moved to new york for
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)

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